The Ebola Epidemic by Connie Goldsmith

The Ebola Epidemic by Connie Goldsmith. February 1, 2016. Twenty-First Century Books, 112 p. ISBN: 9781467792448.  Int Lvl: YA; Rdg Lvl: YA; Lexile: 1160.

An ordinary blue thermos holding blood samples from a sick nun in Zaire reached Belgium’s Institute of Tropical Medicine in September 1976. From the samples, researchers discovered a new virus, which they named the Ebola virus after a river in Central Africa. The virus killed two hundred eighty people before it seemingly disappeared into the jungle. No one suspected the virus would erupt in West Africa nearly four decades later to cause an unprecedented epidemic.

Potentially Sensitive Areas: Clinical discussion of death and dying

 

Reviews

Booklist (December 1, 2015 (Vol. 112, No. 7))
Grades 7-10. The 2014 outbreak of Ebola in West Africa may have caused widespread—and, in some areas, overblown—panic about the disease, but in many ways, medical response to the epidemic was underwhelming. This comprehensive guide begins with the story of the initial discovery of the virus, in 1974, and elaborates on the nature and dangers of the disease before going into the most recent occurrences and their aftermaths. Though it doesn’t make light of the very real and devastating effects Ebola can have on families and entire communities, this is also careful not to contribute to sensationalism: Ebola is a dangerous virus, yes, but not a particularly efficient one, with diseases like the flu killing many more people each year. Goldsmith cites an editorial that compared the Ebola paranoia in the U.S. to that of fearful attitudes during the AIDS crisis before discussing the initial, inefficient international response to the incident and the ongoing search for a cure. A solid, valuable look at a still-mysterious illness and a tumultuous time in recent history.

Kirkus Reviews starred (November 1, 2015)
Welcome to the you-better-be-Brave New World of emergent viruses. Much of this crisp and informative book chronicles the Ebola outbreak that savaged Liberia and parts of neighboring countries in September 2014. Goldsmith, a veteran health/science writer, knows how to invest readers in her story. Here, with the help of a swarm of photographs and maps, she explains how the virus found its way to Liberia–an engrossing story in itself–which necessitates a little background information. Goldsmith delivers science in a serious yet welcoming tone (no one gets talked down to); pathology can be fascinating in its own right, but Goldsmith makes the development of vaccines and rapid-result Ebola tests just as absorbing. There is good material on Doctors without Borders as well as on the locals who took part in the effort to educate people about the nature and transmission of the virus. There is also a pithy explanation of viruses–“Not really alive, yet not quite dead, viruses are the zombies of the microscopic world”–including their ability to shift shape, which makes designing a vaccine so difficult. Meanwhile, a creepy image of the virus snakes across the pages, innocent-looking as spaghetti or yarn, deadly as a blue-ringed octopus. An arresting, illuminating, and unlikely-to-be-forgotten story. (Nonfiction. 12-18)

About the Author

Connie Goldsmith writes books about history, health, and science for older children. An RN with a master’s degree in health, Ms. Goldsmith lives near Sacramento, California.

Her website is www.conniegoldsmith.com.

Teacher Resources

Ebola Outbreak Lesson Plans

Around the Web

The Ebola Epidemic on Amazon

The Ebola Epidemic on Goodreads

The Ebola Epidemic on JLG

The Ebola Epidemic Publisher Page

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